Monday, 30 September 2013

10 minute AB Workout to get a flat stomach

10 minute AB Workout to get a flat stomach

How Sitting Too Long Affects the Body

How Sitting Too Long Affects the Body
How Sitting Too Long Affects the Body

Thursday, 26 September 2013

Heart-healthy diet: 8 steps to prevent heart disease

Heart-healthy diet: 8 steps to prevent heart disease
Complete Article @ Mayo Clinic

1. Control your portion size

2. Eat more vegetables and fruits

3. Select whole grains

4. Limit unhealthy fats and cholesterol

5. Choose low-fat protein sources

6. Reduce the sodium in your food

7. Plan ahead: Create daily menus

8. Allow yourself an occasional treat

Heart-healthy diet: 8 steps to prevent heart disease

'Sugar gel' helps premature babies

'Sugar gel' helps premature babies


A dose of sugar given as a gel rubbed into the inside of the cheek is a cheap and effective way to protect premature babies against brain damage, say experts.

Dangerously low blood sugar affects about one in 10 babies born too early. Untreated, it can cause permanent harm.

Researchers from New Zealand tested the gel therapy in 242 babies under their care and, based on the results, say it should now be a first-line treatment.

Their work is published in The Lancet.

Sugar dose


Dextrose gel treatment costs just over £1 per baby and is simpler to administer than glucose via a drip, say Prof Jane Harding and her team at the University of Auckland.

This is a cost effective treatment and could reduce admissions to intensive care services which are already working at high capacity levels”

Current treatment typically involves extra feeding and repeated blood tests to measure blood sugar levels.

But many babies are admitted to intensive care and given intravenous glucose because their blood sugar remains low - a condition doctors call hypoglycaemia.

The study assessed whether treatment with dextrose gel was more effective than feeding alone at reversing hypoglycaemia.

Neil Marlow, from the Institute for Women's Health at University College London, said that although dextrose gel had fallen into disuse, these findings suggested it should be resurrected as a treatment.

We now had high-quality evidence that it was of value, he said.

Andy Cole, chief executive of premature baby charity Bliss, said: "This is a very interesting piece of new research and we always welcome anything that has the potential to improve outcomes for babies born premature or sick.

"This is a cost-effective treatment and could reduce admissions to intensive care services, which are already working at high capacity levels.

"While the early results of this research show benefits to babies born with low blood sugars, it is clear there is more research to be done to implement this treatment."

Tuesday, 24 September 2013

Every Time You Eat

 Every Time You Eat or Drink You are Either Feeding Disease or Fighting It

Every Time You Eat or Drink You are Either Feeding Disease or Fighting It